Quick Jump

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Accounting for Lawyers

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Mark Westlake
Requirements:
Elective

The course provides an introduction to accounting theory, interpretation of financial statements, and the legal implications of an audit report. Cases applying accounting principles are discussed and examined from a legal and accounting perspective. The course also discusses the application of accounting theory to probate accounting and real estate closings. The objective of the course is to provide a basic understanding of accounting and the accounting profession that will be beneficial in the practice of law. No prior accounting course or experience is necessary for the course.

Administrative Law

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Honorable Lynn M. Alexander
Requirements:
Elective

Administrative Law— whether Federal, State, or Local Government Law—is the body of law which governs the creation and operation of government agencies. This course provides a study of legislative authority and administrative agencies with emphasis upon the administrative process and judicial review. The main objective of this course is to prepare students to litigate cases before administrative agencies by becoming familiar with (1) the formal and informal decision-making processes of administrative agencies; (2) the judicial review of agency actions; and (3) the rule-making process, under the Tennessee Uniform Administrative Procedures Act.

Advanced Deposition Strategy & Practice

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Phillip H. Miller
Requirements:
Elective

Anyone pursuing a career in civil litigation will quickly discover that, for most cases, depositions will make a substantial difference in the case value and the outcome for their clients. The purpose of this course is to prepare the participants to take and defend depositions effectively by learning specific skills, including: (1) how to decide what questions to ask and how to ask them; (2) how to exhaust a witness’s knowledge or opinions; (3) how to eliminate surprises at trial by boxing in a witness’s recollection or opinion; (4) how to introduce case-altering rules, standards, and exhibits despite opposition; (5) how to prepare your client for a deposition; and (6) how to make and deal with objections. The course will also review the case law and the procedural and ethical rules as they apply to deposition conduct.

Advanced Legal Studies

3 Credit Hours
Instructor(s):
Chuck Shonholtz
Requirements:
Fourth Year

A comprehensive review of all topics tested on the Tennessee Bar Examination. This course is designed to emphasize the knowledge, skills, and confidence required to pass the bar examination on the initial attempt. Limited to fourth-year students.

Advanced Property Law

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Wesley D. Turner
Requirements:
Elective

A practical course in the practice of real property, mortgages and title law, with special emphasis on drafting documents, searching title to real property, preparation of title opinions and certificates of titles, reading surveys, and conducting escrow closings.

Bankruptcy Practice & Procedure

2 Credit Hours
Instructor:
Henry E. Hildebrand, III
Requirements:
Elective

A survey of the rights and remedies of debtors and creditors before and during bankruptcy proceeding.

Bar Exam Workshop

3 Credit Hours
Instructors:
David L. Hudson, Jr.
Requirements:
Fourth Year
The Bar Exam Workshop is a partner class to the Advanced Legal Studies curriculum, both designed to prepare students who have completed most of their substantive legal education for the bar and embarking on their legal careers. In the Bar Exam Workshop, students will learn test-taking strategies for the Multistate Bar Exam (MBE), the Multistate Performance Test (MPT), and state essay questions. Students will practice answering questions under timed conditions and enhance their writing and organizational skills.

Business Associations

3 Credit Hours
Instructor:
Kimberley L. Reed-Bracey
Requirements:
Fourth Year

This course provides an overview of the laws governing business entities, including partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. The course covers agency law and focuses on Tennessee law to the extent possible or the model rules that reflect corporate practices in Tennessee. The course familiarizes students with case law and practical problems associated with business organizations and planning.

Civil Procedure

3 Credit Hours
Instructor:
Honorable Donald R. Ash
Requirements:
Second Year

This course provides an introduction to the Rules of Civil Procedure and the application of these rules. We will also focus on subject matter jurisdiction, personal jurisdiction, Erie Doctrine and venue. Emphasis will be on the Tennessee Rules, but we will also cover the Federal rules, particularly where they differ.

Civil Trial Practice

2 Credit Hours
Instructor:
Daniel P. Berexa
Requirements:
At least one course of the trial practice series must be taken, typically third year

This course introduces students to trial practice in a “learning by doing” environment. The primary objectives of the course are: 1) to develop the essential skills and competencies required of a trial lawyer; 2) to enhance the student’s understanding of discovery and pretrial motion practice and how both can impact the outcome of a case; 3) to understand the trial process and courtroom protocol; 4) to enhance public speaking and advocacy skills; and, 5) to learn to be a professional and ethical advocate. Students participate in several small group activities to learn basic trial skills, advocacy theory and the rules and law applicable to civil trial practice. The course culminates with student conducted jury trials in which class members work in teams on fictional, but realistic, cases such as personal injury or breach of contract claims. Each student team engages in discovery; drafts, files, and argues pretrial motions; conducts voir dire; gives opening statements; presents evidence; examines and cross-examines witnesses; makes and responds to objections; and, makes closing arguments. In addition to peer feedback, the instructor critiques and evaluates students on their use of skills and techniques taught in the class, argument of the law and facts, legal research, written product, and overall preparation and performance.

Conflicts of Law

2 Credit Hours
Instructor:
Brian Christian Neal
Requirements:
Fourth Year

The study of jurisdictional and choice of law issues encountered because litigation or a transaction has multistate contacts, and of the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments.

Constitutional Criminal Law and Procedure

2 Credit Hours
Instructors:
Patrick Frogge and Gen. Glenn R. Funk
Requirements:
First Year

A survey of Constitutional Criminal Law with emphasis on the U.S. Supreme Court’s interpretation of Constitutional rights of the accused and study of Criminal Procedure with emphasis on the Tennessee Rules of Criminal and Appellate Procedure. This course examines federal and Tennessee criminal law and procedure. The class examines the stages of a criminal case from arrest through appeal with emphasis on the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution and parallel provisions of the Tennessee Constitution.

Constitutional Law

3 Credit Hours
Instructor:
Dean William C. Koch, Jr.
Requirements:
Second Year

This course provides an introduction to the United States Constitution and the processes and principles of constitutional adjudication. It focuses on the language of the Constitution and the decisions of the United States Supreme Court interpreting and applying this language. Emphasis will be given to (a) the origin, scope, and limitations of the power of judicial review in constitutional cases, (b) the allocation of powers and responsibilities among the three branches of the federal government, (c) the distribution of power between the federal government and the states, and (d) the protection of fundamental textual and non-textual individual rights and liberties, including those embodied in the Bill of Rights, the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment [both procedural and substantive], the Equal Protection Clause, and the First Amendment.

Contracts

3 Credit Hours
Instructor:
William L. Harbison
Requirements:
First Year

Study in the development, performance and remedies for non-performance of enforceable agreements. The course is a blend of traditional common law and changes brought about by Article Two of the Uniform Commercial Code.

Crimes

1 Credit Hour
Instructors:
Patrick Frogge and Gen. Glenn R. Funk
Requirements:
First Year

This course reviews Tennessee Crimes, Defenses, Procedure and Constitutional Law issues and covers client representation from initial interview through post sentencing issues. Emphasis is on the practical aspects of criminal defense.

Criminal Trial Practice

2 Credit Hours
Instructors:
Honorable Mark Fishburn
Requirements:
At least one course of the trial practice series must be taken, typically third year

The course is primarily intended to provide students with the fundamental knowledge, skills, tools and techniques needed to effectively prosecute or defend the trial of a criminal case. Achievement of this objective necessarily demands that students have an understanding of and an appreciation for trial dynamics by: 1) developing practical tools to aid in improving pretrial and trial organizational skills; 2) enhancing critical thinking and legal analytical skills when evaluating and presenting evidence; 3) enhancing the cohesiveness and effectiveness of presenting evidence; 4) enhancing understanding and of pretrial motions; 5) developing an understanding of the human psychology of decision making and how it impacts the trial process; 6) enhancing oral and written presentation skills; 7) gaining a greater appreciation of and respect for the importance of professionalism and ethics in advocacy.

Domestic Relations

1 Credit Hour
Instructors:
Honorable R.E. Lee Davies, Honorable Philip E. Smith
Requirements:
Third Year

This course focuses on major concepts in Tennessee divorce and family law. Topics include antenuptial agreements, annulment, child custody, child support, and enforcement, contempt, domestic abuse, grounds for and defenses to divorce, jurisdiction and procedure, parental relocation, and spousal support. Domestic Relations provides an introduction to practically every aspect of Tennessee family law. This course focuses on the various categories of family law that a domestic relations practitioner may face in their practice. Emphasis will be given to relevant statutory enactments, the policy behind the enactments, major cases interpreting the application of statutes, cases establishing the common law areas of family law and the practical application of statutory law and case law for the domestic relations practitioner. The major topics of discussion will include: grounds for divorce, division of property, alimony, antenuptial agreements, domestic abuse, custody and child support, relocation and contempt.

The main goal of this course is to provide a basic understanding of family law. Students will be instructed not only on the basic concepts of family law but also on the interplay of other areas of law such as contract, criminal and constitutional law and how these areas affect family law cases.

Domestic Trial Practice

1 Credit Hour
Instructors:
Honorable R.E. Lee Davies, Honorable Philip E. Smith
Requirements:
At least one course of the trial practice series must be taken, typically third year

This course is designed to take the student from the initial client interview all the way through a divorce trial. Students will learn how to conduct an interview with a potential client, access the client’s goals and provide objective advice. You will be taken through the discovery process, both written and oral. Topics will include types of written discovery, depositions, responding to discovery, pretrial motions, use of experts, and requests for injunctive relief. You will engage in mock interviews and mock depositions; prepare and participate in a mock mediation and finally, you will prepare for and participate in a trial which will include opening statements, examination of witnesses, and closing argument.

Employment & Labor Law

2 Credit Hours
Instructor:
Trevor Wayne Howell
Requirements:
Elective

A review of the law governing regulation of the employment relationship. Age and handicap/disability prohibitions, anti-retaliation and whistle blower laws, and common law protection against wrongful discharges are covered. Race and sex discrimination prohibitions are emphasized. Legal problems incident to collective bargaining by employees at common-law and under modern federal and state legislation, Taft Hartley Act, closed shop, union shop, picketing, the strike, rights of labor and rights of management, common law rights of employees and rights under modern federal and state discrimination statutes are examined.

Entertainment Law

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Ramona P. DeSalvo
Requirements:
Elective
The course is a review and analysis of recording and publishing agreements and issues facing the players in the entertainment industry.  Lectures will provide key concepts and information that will help the student learn how the entertainment industry (in particular the music industry) works.  By the end of the course, the student should be conversant with complex issues such as (1) controlled compositions and how artist contracts deal with them; (2) cross-collateralization and how it works in artist agreements; (3) the revenue streams associated with recorded music; and (4) how to calculate basic artist and producer royalties given appropriate information.  The student should develop a more fine-tuned and disciplined approach to reading, analyzing, and recognizing legal issues in the music industry. 

 

Estate Planning

1 Credit Hour
Instructors:
K. Harlan Dodson, III, Andra J. Hedrick
Requirements:
Third Year

The goal of the course is to prepare students to meet with actual planning clients, to determine their planning needs, to draft basic wills and related documents, and to spot the problems which require more study. We focus on practical advice as to how to plan for typical client situations which lawyers will encounter as opposed to more theoretical issues. A student successfully completing the course will be prepared to competently represent clients who come to them for wills and planning. Unlike many law school courses focusing on a specific area of the law, this is course is a synthesis of many areas. Estate planning by its nature may include considering the respective laws concerning wills and trusts, federal and state taxes, retirement accounts, business entities, and real and personal property, as well as human behavior.

Ethics and Professionalism

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Laura L. Chastain
Requirements:
Third Year

This course addresses the ethical standards and professional responsibility required of Tennessee lawyers and judges relating to the practice of law and to the administration of law in the courts of this state, and the regulation thereof. The three main objectives of this course are to enable students: (1) to be conversant with the Tennessee Rules of Professional Conduct and the Tennessee Code of Judicial Conduct; (2) to prepare students to take and pass the MPRE; and (3) to inspire students to ethically practice law. The class format is lecture and class discussion based on readings and out of class assignments. Participation in class discussion is expected. This course contains subject matter that will be included on the Tennessee bar examination.

Evidence

3 Credit Hours
Instructor:
Honorable Steve R. Dozier
Requirements:
Second Year

A comprehensive study of all aspects of the Federal Rules, the Tennessee Rules, and the Majority Rules of Evidence.

First Amendment Law

1 Credit Hour
Requirements:
Elective

This course covers the history of the First Amendment and the five basics freedoms it contains of religion, speech, press, assembly and petitions.

General Sessions Practicum

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Honorable Angelita Blackshear Dalton
Requirements:
Elective

This course provides practical insights into the General Sessions Court practice. The class focuses on applying relevant rules and procedures for civil and criminal court actions, as well as the proper filing of court forms. Students will hear from experienced lawyers on the art of negotiating, trial techniques, and maintaining client relationships. Students will learn the various stages of a case as it moves through the General Sessions Court. Students also will represent a client in at least one criminal or civil matter under the supervision of a licensed attorney.

Immigration Law

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Michael Smallbone
Requirements:
Elective

This course teaches concepts fundamental to Immigration Law so that students will understand and be able to apply them to analysis of issues arising in factual settings.

Intellectual Property Law

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Ramona P. DeSalvo
Requirements:
Elective

An introduction to the law of patent, copyright, trademark, unfair competition, trade scret, and other regimes through which the legal system extends protection to ideas, their use, or their expression.

Juvenile Practice & Procedure

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Honorable Carlton M. Lewis
Requirements:
Elective

This course examines the legal and philosophical bases for a separate juvenile court system, and of the state’s rights as parens patriae to interfere in the parent-child relationship. It also discusses juvenile court jurisdiction over the delinquent child, the status offender and the dependent and negelected child through the entire court process from investigation and arrest or summons, to adjudication and disposition, including continued supervision by the court or social worker.

Law Office Management

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
John D. Kitch
Requirements:
Elective

This course is designed to teach the basic tools for establishing and sustaining a law practice. It is organized around the practical skills a lawyer needs in order to successfully combine his or her legal knowledge with good business practices, focusing on efficient time management, financial management, risk management, client relations, marketing, staff management, and work-life balance. The class format is lecture and class discussion based on readings and real-world assignments.

Legal Skills & Values I

1 Credit Hour
Instructors:
General Glenn R. FunkCandi Henry, and Michele Wojciechowski
 Requirements:
First Year

This course starts the process of developing the legal research and writing skills necessary in the law profession. These skills are taught in conjunction with development of the broad professional knowledge and demeanor expected of a lawyer. The course incorporates an overview of the American legal system, primary sources, secondary sources, and various legal research methods, with emphasis on electronic research and materials. The course’s approach to legal writing emphasizes clear writing and sound structure as assignments progress in complexity from professional correspondence to persuasive memos. Students will learn how to use standard legal citation to incorporate statutory and case law research into office memoranda and a motion. Students will also learn how to draft advice letters and write effective essays.

Legal Skills & Values II

1 Credit Hour
Instructors:
Christopher Hugan & Dianne Ferrell Neal
Requirements:
Third Year
This course involves the drafting of various kinds of legal instruments routinely used in the practice of law, such as legal memoranda, trial and appellate briefs, wills and contracts.

Mortgages

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Wesley D. Turner
Requirements:
Required for 2018 graduates; then offered as elective

A study of real estate mortgages with emphasis on the creation, validity and enforcement thereof, dealing with recording acts, restricting covenants, easements and other encumbrances that effect title to real estate.

Negotiation Theory & Practice

2 Credit Hours
Instructor:
Larry Bridgesmith
Requirements:
Elective

This course is designed to offer a basic experiential introduction to the concepts, instruments, functions, and theories of modern negotiation. The purpose of this introduction is to give some of the information needed to better understand the dynamics of interpersonal, business and legally related negotiation. We will begin with a discussion of negotiations as interpersonal communication. We will examine avoiding exploitation in mixed-motive exchanges. We will explore distributive bargaining strengths and weaknesses. We will examine the use of integrative bargaining techniques and those settings in which they might be best used. Finally, the landscape of legal jurisprudence will be reviewed in order to apply appropriate ideologies and techniques to the complex adaptive system of American business and personal interaction.

Property Law

3 Credit Hours
Instructor:
Scott Webster Fielding
Requirements:
Second Year

This course provides a basic survey of the law of property with an emphasis on real estate. The course examines the forms and methods by which property interests are held, used, and transferred. It includes a study of adverse possession, present and future estates, concurrent ownership, landlord and tenant, easements, promises respecting the use of land, vendor and purchaser, conveyances of land, the recording system, land title insurance, public control of land use, eminent domain, condominiums, and introduction to personal property.

Remedies

3 Credit Hours
Instructor:
M. Clark Spoden
Requirements:
Third Year

Remedies class is a mixture of substantive law and procedure. Substantively, the class covers the four major types of remedies, common law damages, equity and injunctive relief, restitution, and ancillary remedies such as contempt, collection, and attorney fees. Remedial defenses and the right to jury trial in civil cases are also topics that are covered. In order to understand the potential remedies a court might issue, students must also grasp the basics of the underlying substantive law such as torts and contracts. Particular attention is given to when equitable remedies maybe available, including the procedural requirements for injunctive relief. Students are introduced to restitution with particular emphasis on unjust enrichment and constructive trusts. The class also provides a basic introduction to the process of collecting judgments. Throughout the course, the practical issues that often confront lawyers and litigants are reviewed and discussed.

Rigorous Writing Exercise

1 Credit Hour Pass/Fail

Instructor:
Students are assigned a mentor to guide them through this independent study project

Requirements:
Second and Third Year – 2 credits total required

Under the personal guidance of an experienced judge or lawyer, each student will select an appropriate topic and complete a paper or series of papers on that topic. A rigorous writing experience involves the closely supervised preparation of a significant research paper or series of related papers of substantial length and sophistication. The supervision includes (1) participation in the selection of the writing assignment or topic, (2) assistance with the formulation of an appropriate research plan, (3) substantial feedback and critique of the student’s research and drafting, and (4) individual sessions to provide assessment and critique of the student’s written project. Read more here.

 

Sales

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Honorable David M. Bragg
Requirements:
Fourth Year

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the law of sales under the Uniform Commercial Code (“UCC”). The UCC governs many of the transactions individuals and businesses engage in every day, including most e-commerce purchases. Sales is a topic that is tested on both essay and multiple choice portions of the bar exam. Learning the law of sales provides an opportunity to refresh your knowledge of basic common law contract doctrine, since the material will frequently compare the UCC rule to the common law rule on a particular issue. The UCC’s provisions on sales (found in Article 2) are of special interest in this context, since they alter some of the most basic rules of common law contracts. This comparison is of more than just academic interest, since bar questions often focus on just such differences. Thus, the course provides an occasion to jump-start your preparations for the bar exam. Another reason for this course is methodological. Students focus on reading cases during many law classes. Yet many areas of practice are shaped by statutes, and lawyers need to be able to identify and find the applicable statute. While we will read some cases, the book and class discussions are based on problems that are designed to promote analyzing a statute and applying it to a set of facts. These skills are transferable to every area of the law.

Secured Transactions

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Honorable David M. Bragg
Requirements:
Fourth Year

This course focuses on commercial and consumer financing using personal property as collateral under UCC Article 9. The course includes study of contract and personal property law, focusing on the creation, priority and remedies of secured transactions under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code and related bodies of law. The course builds on the basic contract and property courses in two ways. First, it focuses on mastering provisions of the UCC — a complex, detailed statute that provides an integrated and interrelated body of law with a distinctive philosophical approach. Second, it focuses on the activities of the both the consumer and commercial business actors, who typically bargain at arms’ length, are motivated by the goal of economic gain and have the opportunity to obtain legal advice before making plans. Accordingly, the course should be of interest to students who want to develop their skills in statutory analysis and in understanding and planning consumer and business transactions.

Social Security Disability Law and Practice

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Steven N. Perrigo
Requirements:
Elective

This course provides an introduction to Social Security Law. Social Security operates under complex rules to provide critical benefits to millions of individuals and family members each year through administration of its retirement, disability, and survivors’ programs. Topics covered include: eligibility criteria, claims procedures, post-entitlement actions, evidentiary requirements, solvency, the role of attorneys, and practical advice for working with both claimants and the government.

Technology and The Law

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
R. Eddie Davidson
Requirements:
Elective

A course designed to equip each student with essential skills involved in 1) digital practice management, 2) digital discovery and 3) digital courtroom presentations. Each student should have the skills necessary to create, manage, search and locate digital files (as required in Federal Court), generate and propound discovery in digital format, and finally, within the context of an actual moot court scenario, enhance their courtroom appearance with a digital presentation of documents, video, and/or other appropriate digital imagery.

Tennessee Constitutional Law

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Dean William C. Koch, Jr.
Requirements:
Elective

This course provides students with a detailed understanding of the Tennessee Constitution. It examines overarching principles of constitutional law, including federalism, separation of powers and adequate and independent state law grounds. The course emphasizes key provisions of Article I of the Tennessee Constitution – the Declaration of Rights, including provisions related to freedom of religion, freedom of expression, the right to privacy, and protection from unreasonable searches and seizures. The course compares and contrasts protections for individual liberty in the Declaration of Rights to those found in the U.S. Constitution.

Torts

3 Credit Hours
Instructor:
Honorable Marshall L. Davidson, III
Requirements:
First Year

Torts is a dynamic area of the law that focuses on civil wrongs. As such, this course is concerned with the wide array of injuries to people, property, and economic interests resulting from such wrongs and how the legal system responds to the diverse problems raised by those injuries. The course covers a broad range of topics, including liability for intentional harm to persons and property and for similar harm caused by negligent conduct. In addition, the course encompasses injuries to business and family relationships, strict liability, premises liability, and torts such as nuisance, misrepresentation, defamation, and invasion of privacy, among others. In each situation, someone claims that another has caused harm and looks to the law for redress. Finally, the course covers defenses, damages, and practical approaches to resolving and litigating tort cases.

Torts II

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Honorable Marshall L. Davidson, III
Requirements:
Elective (required for anyone graduating after 2018)

Torts II is a continued exploration of the law that focuses on personal injury and property damage claims, a major part of modern civil litigation. Like Torts I, the course is concerned with injuries to people, property, and economic interests resulting from civil wrongs and how the legal system responds to the diverse problems raised by such injuries. Torts I covered a broad range of topics, including liability for intentional harm to persons and property and for similar harm caused by negligent conduct. Building upon the foundations laid in that course, Torts II focuses on interferences with family relationships, products liability, misuse of the legal system, civil rights torts, and the subjects of governmental and employee immunity. The course also covers defenses, damages, and practical approaches to resolving and litigating cases involving these dynamic areas of the law.

Wills

2 Credit Hours
Instructor:
Jeffrey Mobley
Requirements:
Third Year

Wills is an in-depth study of the Tennessee law of intestate succession and wills, and an introductory (less in-depth) examination of related subjects such as incapacity documents, trusts, and estate administration in probate court. The name of the course – “Wills” – is a bit misleading. The course covers not only Wills but also intestate administration (dying without a will), powers of attorney, the basics of trust law, and estate administration in probate court. You do not write a will in this class, but you learn about the laws pertaining to wills, so you need to master this subject matter to be competent to draft a will. We begin by learning about intestate administration, concepts of representation (is per stirpes a social disease? – you’ll have to show up to find out) and basic terminology, then with that background we move into wills: capacity to make a will; grounds for will contests; rules for properly executing attested and holographic wills; revocation, republication, integration of wills; interpretation and construction of ambiguities in wills; lapses, ademption and abatement of bequests. Then we learn about elective share and other rights of surviving spouses and pretermitted children. Next we address incapacity documents (powers of attorney and medical directives). Then we learn about non-probate transfers, revocable and irrevocable trusts, and take a peek at Tennessee’s array of trust laws including its version of the Uniform Trust Code. Finally, we end up with an introduction to estate administration in probate court.

Workers’ Compensation

1 Credit Hour
Instructor:
Honorable Marshall L. Davidson, III
Requirements:
Elective

Workers’ compensation is an integral part of American law that focuses on work-related injuries, diseases, and deaths. As such, workers’ compensation law impacts workers, businesses, and the consuming public in direct, tangible ways. This course covers a broad range of topics, including the purpose of workers’ compensation, its intended scope, and the benefits and disadvantages for injured workers, employers, and the public. In addition, the course encompasses a variety of concepts fundamental to workers’ compensation, such as the definition of injury, causation requirements, mental injuries, occupational diseases, the types of employments exempted, and notice and procedural requirements. Finally, the course covers the types of benefits injured workers may seek, defenses employers may raise in response, and practical approaches to resolving and litigating workers’ compensation cases.