Nashville School of Law

TN Supreme Court Amends Attorney Licensing Rule

The Tennessee Supreme Court has amended Supreme Court Rule 7, which focuses on the licensing of attorneys to practice law in Tennessee. These most recent changes follow other modifications that were made to the rule over the past several years.

The most recent changes primarily affect practice pending admission, in-house counsel registration by non-Tennessee lawyers, and the rules governing law students working under supervision as part of a law school educational program.

Read more at TNCourts.gov

March CLE@NSL: Orders of Protection – A Shield & A Sword

Tuesday, March 19 • 6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Domestic violence, as well as other types of unwanted contact between intimate partners such as harassment and stalking, is all too common today.  In response, the legislature created orders of protection to provide a swift and efficient civil process that enable judges to address domestic violence in all its forms.  While the ex parte nature of these orders provides the speedy relief required, it can also provide opportunities for misuse.  Orders of protection can be obtained without legal representation, and at the initial hearing, they lack procedural safeguards against strategic conduct and inflated or false accusations.  The purpose of this program is to enable practitioners to become well versed in the proper and improper uses of orders of protections and to familiarize themselves with the standard forms used to obtain orders of protection. 

Alumni pay only $50 for 1.5 hours CLE ($65 for non-alums). Or, take all our CLE this year – more than 22 hours available – for $399 ($449 for non-alums).

Nashville School of Law announces Faculty Changes for 2019

A tremendous faculty consisting of judges and attorneys who are leaders in their field has always been fundamental to the success of Nashville School of Law and its graduates. As the School looks to some faculty changes in 2019, we continue to honor our history of “today’s leaders teaching tomorrow’s lawyers.”

Our faculty transition is set into motion by the retirements of Judge Don Ash and Judge David Bragg as professors at Nashville School of Law. After years of significant contributions to the School, both have announced their tenure will conclude at the end of the current academic year.

Dean Koch on the 1979 Tennessee Coup

Nashville School of Law Dean William C. Koch, Jr. joins ‘Grand Divisions’ podcast to discuss the 1979 transition of gubernatorial power in Tennessee. Described by some as a coup to remove Gov. Ray Blanton when it was discovered he was selling pardons, Koch talks about his personal role as a member of the Tennessee attorney general’s office.

Listen to “The 1979 Coup – When Tennessee Democrats unseated their own governor to swear in a Republican early” on Spreaker.